I Like Facebook.

I have a confession to make. I like Facebook.
Well, I think I like the marketed idea behind Facebook. You know the one: The nice utopian idea of bringing people together in an online community.
The thing is, in order for people to come together, to share photos, update statuses, play games, and what ever else. Data is collected.
And that data, that’s worth something, which seems to be something that we took for granted.
Maybe we all thought our data was so general that it would have no real world impact?

Perhaps we didn’t care enough to read the fine print?
Perhaps it’s not just the data harvesting for the Donald Trump campaign?
It could also be that it was done through the use of an innocent looking quiz?
Maybe it’s that Facebook tried to sue to stop the story from getting out?
But now could be a good time to re-evaluate, and learn about our relationship with social networks? It’s not just the data we willingly give, but with the revelation that Facebook has been keeping track of calls and text messages from our phones, it’s also clear we need to seriously think about the phone apps we install.

Why I’m I going on about Facebook here? Two things; Parenting blogs seem to discuss social networks and smart phones on a regular basis. These conversations normally focus on the amount of time spent on electronic devices / social media, and if that time is healthy and safe? Should we also be discussing the information we willingly give up to large companies such as Facebook?

Secondly, parenting bloggers in general also seem to include a lot of time on Facebook, and Instagram. Perhaps this is a reminder for us all to check what we put on social networks about our families and ourselves?

I like Facebook.

But right now. I don’t trust Facebook.

Mudpie Fridays

Facebook Christmas Cover Photo Collection

Every now and then, people find us after doing search for a combination of words that we wouldn’t normally expect. An example of this has been the flood of people search for Facebook Nativity or Facebook Christmas Cover Photos. (Cover photos, are what you find on the top of a Facebook profile)

Well… this has ended up inspiring a random session on Photoshop, which then led to The Sofa offering a couple of Christmas Cover Photos a couple of years ago.

I’ve updated the original images to match the up to date measurements for Facebooks Cover Photos

Please feel free to download the below, link back here, and use to your hearts content:

(Left clicking, right clicking, then clicking “Save Image As” should do the trick.)

 

For more images, please see my portfolios over at redbubble and at picfair.com

This post first appeared over on The Church Sofa.

Looking For Good News?

Have you ever woken up, and checked the news, wondering what else is wrong with the world?

Perhaps with something like this going through your head?

Good News Page

The Sofa cant shake the feeling that the world is filled with bad news story followed by bad news story. (At least according to the newspapers anyway…). Well The Sofa has cracked a little, and has created The Good News Page on Facebook, in an attempt to make the web a little more positive.

The Good News Page is there to talk about the good stuff in the world.

The Good News Page is there to put something positive into your Facebook feed.

If you like the idea, can you spare The Good News Page a like, and get some good news into your Facebook world.

Who deleted me, and why do I want to know?

There’s this app, designed to work with the worlds most popular social network, to take your curiosity and uses it to tease your self esteem. It’s called “Who Deleted Me?”.

Once you’ve installed it, Who Deleted Me takes a copy of your friend list, and uses this copy to tell you if any one “disappears” from it. It apparently also lets you see the last time your friends logged into Facebook, as well as keeping note of the people you’ve deemed not good enough for your friend list.

My question about it, is quite simply, Why?

Why would you want to know all this? Does this show us something about the importance that we put on a connection within a social network, when we now have easy ways of finding out who broke that connection? If being friends on Facebook is the new way of certifying a friendship, is being unfriended on Facebook the new personal insult?

Besides, what would you do with this information anyway? Is there a positive outcome to knowing that someone has served you with the ultimate in personal insults deleted you from their Facebook friend list?

Does watching who logged into Facebook and when they last logged seem creepy to anyone else? I can imagine (hopefully only) situations in schools, where people have logged in, and not liked the photo belonging to the ‘popular kid’. That ‘popular kid’ now has a tool to act as Big Brother online.

All credit to the guy that wrote Who Deleted Me. This is an app that plays into our curiosity, and seems to have become popular as a result. I wonder what impact this, and apps like this could have on online behavior?

With all the above said, I’m still curious to try it out. You can download it from here, but the website does seem to be struggling at the moment.

Can anyone who is friends with me on Facebook, please let me know if they install this… just so I know who to look out for…

What do you think of Who Deleted Me?
Are you going to be trying it out?

 

 

The Dad Network

Ello?

It seems I’ve signed up to and made myself a profile on Ello – the new social network that isn’t Facebook. (I signed up for an invite awhile ago, I guess their beta phase is ramping up or something as mine has just come through.)

Describing themselves, Ello has this to say:

Your social network is owned by advertisers.

Every post you share, every friend you make, and every link you follow is tracked, recorded, and converted into data. Advertisers buy your data so they can show you more ads. You are the product that’s bought and sold.

We believe there is a better way. We believe in audacity. We believe in beauty, simplicity, and transparency. We believe that the people who make things and the people who use them should be in partnership.

We believe a social network can be a tool for empowerment. Not a tool to deceive, coerce, and manipulate — but a place to connect, create, and celebrate life.

You are not a product.

Anyway, first impressions are that the design of it seems very clean, very clear, not as cluttered as Facebook. I’ve not had much of a play with its features yet, but the stand out seems to be “Friends / Noise”, a handy way of filtering out the noise from what you actually want to see.

Let me know if you’d like an invite…?