10 Ways To Feel Better on Blue Monday

Been feeling like crap?

Like really – more then having a bad day crap?

You are not alone.

January is generally known for being crap. Seriously, it seems its a mix of things.

To start with, Christmas is over. The bright lights, excitement, and seasonal greetings, are being replaced with dark nights, winter flu, and grumpy souls on the bus. Less mince pies, more salad. You’ve probably also realised those New Year Resolutions aren’t working.

In fact this month is so rubbish a few years ago a PR company coined the phrase Blue Monday to describe the tipping point of crappy feelings that people feel in this post festive gloom. In short, Blue Monday is meant to be the most depressing day of the year. This year Blue Monday is on Monday 16th January, the timing of which is worked out based on a complex formula involving all of the above mentioned issues, and probably more.

I guess “Blue Monday” is mostly rubbish, but January may be rubbish month for many people. It probably a good time to remind ourselves to look after our own mental health.

I’ve found this over at Social Work Tutor Facebook page, and wanted to share this in case it helps someone…

I guess, have a chat with your GP if you’re feeling depressed, stressed, anxious or whatever.

Or at least speak to someone.

Chat to someone online if that’s easier.

kooth.com and www.qwellcounselling.com

You are not alone.

10 Reasons Why Dads Matter.

Dear Dads.

Ever felt that all the attention is on the mum? You know, she has the mum groups, the various classes, the extra time to actually understand the kid, and you have… work.

Well Babycentre have come up with 10 reasons why you also matter:

1. Who else, other than mum, will tuck her into bed at night, teach her how to ride a bike, fund her first holiday with friends and buy her first pint?

2. He’s got your genes. You are a part of his history, who he is, how he looks, right down to those big ears and awkward gait.

3. You matter to your partner, too. When you get stuck in from the start, breastfeeding is more successful and she is less likely to suffer from postnatal depression.

4. You’ll raise brainy kids. Children with involved fathers have better social skills when they reach nursery and do better in examinations at 16.

5. Being a good dad keeps your child sane. Father-child closeness is a crucial predictor of long-term mental health.

6. Successful professional women tend to have at least one thing in common: fathers who respect and encourage them.

7. Do well as a father and, when your child’s time comes, she’ll be a better mum.

8. You’ll keep him out of prison. Good fathering means your son is less likely to have a criminal record.

9. She’ll be happier later. Father involvement at age seven is correlated with your daughter’s contentment with love at 33.

10. Do you want your child to have higher self-esteem, be friendly and trust others? Your influence makes a difference.